2010 Feb. 5: IA Eastern & Quad Cities area: Air quality alert issued for eastern Iowa, QC area

2010 Feb. 5: IA Eastern & Quad Cities area: Air quality alert issued for eastern Iowa, QC area

Because of high fine particulate pollution levels today (Feb. 5) in excess of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) health thresholds, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is recommending Iowans with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, and children limit prolonged outdoor exertion.
The EPA’s 24-hour health threshold for fine particles is 35 micrograms per cubic meter. As of noon Friday, fine particle levels averaged in the low 40s across Iowa, with readings of 44 in Davenport, 43 in Muscatine, 43 in Iowa City, 41 in Cedar Rapids and 43 in Des Moines.
According to the Iowa DNR, air monitors Thursday, Feb. 4 recorded 24-hour fine particle levels above EPA health standards at three locations in Davenport: 39 at Jefferson School, 42 at Blackhawk Foundry, and 41 at Hayes School.
The DNR reported levels above the 24-hour fine particle standard were also recorded two locations in Clinton: 38 at Rainbow Park and 41 at Chancy Park. In addition, 24-hour averages above the health threshold were recorded at Hoover School in Iowa City (39), Garfield School in Muscatine (37), Linn County Public Health (37), the Water Tower in Waterloo (40), and at Lake Sugema near Keosauqua (36).
Fine particles are emitted by vehicle traffic and other combustion sources, and are formed by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Stagnant air masses do not allow the fine particles to disperse, and pollutant levels rise.
EPA’s national air quality map is available online at AirNow.
For the Iowa DNR news release on the health alert and fine particulate pollution, visit: www.iowadnr.gov
For additional information on fine particulate pollution and the QC region’s brush with non-attainment designation by the EPA last year, CLICK HERE.2010 Feb. 5: IA: Air Quality Alert Issued For Iowa


POSTED: 1:27 pm CST February 5, 2010
UPDATED: 1:29 pm CST February 5, 2010
 
WINDSOR HEIGHTS, Iowa — Fine particulate pollution levels in excess of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency health threshold were measured Friday morning across Iowa. Fine particulate levels near EPA health standards are expected to persist until mid-day Saturday.
The Department of Natural Resources recommends that Iowans with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, and children limit prolonged outdoor exertion until air quality conditions improve.
The EPA’s 24-hour health threshold for fine particles is 35 micrograms per cubic meter. As of noon today, fine particle levels averaged in the low 40s across Iowa, with higher levels in northeast Iowa. Cedar Rapids recorded 41, Clinton 38, Davenport 44, Des Moines 43, Emmetsburg 45, Iowa City 43, Lake Sugema 42, Muscatine 43, Viking Lake 39 and Waterloo 47.
Yesterday, air monitors recorded 24-hour fine particle levels above EPA health standards at three locations in Davenport: 39 at Jefferson School, 42 at Blackhawk Foundry, and 41 at Hayes School. Levels above the 24-hour fine particle standard were also recorded two locations in Clinton: 38 at Rainbow Park and 41 at Chancy Park. In addition, 24-hour averages above the health threshold were recorded at Hoover School in Iowa City (39), Garfield School in Muscatine (37), Linn County Public Health (37), the Water Tower in Waterloo (40), and at Lake Sugema near Keosauqua (36).
Fine particles are emitted by vehicle traffic and other combustion sources, and are formed by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Stagnant air masses do not allow the fine particles to disperse, and pollutant levels rise.

Comments

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  • No wonder I’m having to use my nebulizer today.

    Feb. 5, 2010 4:32pm CST | from shutterbug
  • Ethanol fuel usage is partly to blame, it doesnt burn as clean and pollutes more than pure gas. Say no to ethanol. When you put gas in your car next time, put in gas that does not contain ethanol.

    Feb. 5, 2010 4:03pm CST | from 1dohdohdoh
  • You can thank coal power plants and industrial factories for most of your stagnant particle air pollution. Just think if you lived somewhere like in the Southeast where the air is always stagnant. This shows that lesser populated states can have bad pollution just like higher populated states. All it takes is lots of plumes from coal power stations, a some large dirty industry, trucks, and still air. And remember that when the air moves, your pollution is just blowing eastward towards other states, not disappearing.

    Air Quality Alert

    The Department of Natural Resources has issued an Air Quality Advisory for the entire viewing area until noon on Saturday. Fine particulate levels near EPA health standards are expected to persist across the area until noon on Saturday. The Department of Natural Resources recommends that individuals with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly and children limit prolonged exertion until air quality conditions improve.

    Posted under AIr Quality

    This post was written by Schnack on February 5, 2010

     

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