2010 Feb. 22: DC: Comment on Sen. Lindsay Graham (R-SC) proposal: Natural Gas Essential To RES

1
agree
Do you agree?

Natural Gas Essential To RES

By Skip Horvath

President, Natural Gas Supply Association

Leaving natural gas out of any clean energy standard is like holding the Winter Olympics without snow. Natural gas is that vital fuel that policy makers need in order to achieve clean energy.
In a perfect world, natural gas producers prefer a market-based approach to meeting clean energy standards, allowing natural gas to compete fairly and fulfill its potential as part of the clean energy mix. If instead a clean energy standard is adopted, it ought to be crafted so that utilities have the option to use natural gas in order to reduce their emissions. It’s here, reliable, clean, and as a bonus, it is a jobs-creating machine.
To get an idea of just how significantly natural gas could contribute to meeting clean energy goals, look no further than a study released by the Congressional Research Service in January. CRS calculated the potential reduction in CO2 emissions simply by making the most possible use of natural gas plants that are currently under-used. Maximizing the use of existing natural gas plants could immediately cut carbon emissions up to 20 percent, …
Leaving natural gas out of any clean energy standard is like holding the Winter Olympics without snow. Natural gas is that vital fuel that policy makers need in order to achieve clean energy.
In a perfect world, natural gas producers prefer a market-based approach to meeting clean energy standards, allowing natural gas to compete fairly and fulfill its potential as part of the clean energy mix. If instead a clean energy standard is adopted, it ought to be crafted so that utilities have the option to use natural gas in order to reduce their emissions. It’s here, reliable, clean, and as a bonus, it is a jobs-creating machine.
To get an idea of just how significantly natural gas could contribute to meeting clean energy goals, look no further than a study released by the Congressional Research Service in January. CRS calculated the potential reduction in CO2 emissions simply by making the most possible use of natural gas plants that are currently under-used. Maximizing the use of existing natural gas plants could immediately cut carbon emissions up to 20 percent, CRS said.
As an added benefit, allowing utilities to use clean natural gas for power generation would necessitate more natural gas to be produced, leading to significant jobs creation. We’ve seen the natural gas jobs effect already in states like New York and Pennsylvania, which have created tens of thousands of new jobs in the two years since production from shale gas in those states has taken off.
If reducing emissions is the goal, natural gas passes the emissions inspection test. Jobs creation? Check. Reliable and here today? Check. We are confident that as Sen. Graham’s draft gets vetted, it will expand to recognize natural gas’s ability to help meet a clean energy standard.
Advertisements
This entry was posted in S-T States = SC, SD, TN, TX =South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s